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Basic Law Enforcement Training (BLET)

Curriculum

Basic Law Enforcement Training (BLET) is designed to give students essential skills required for entry-level employment as law enforcement officers with state, county, or municipal governments, or with private enterprise.

This program utilizes state-commission-mandated topics and methods of instruction. General subjects include but are not limited to criminal, juvenile, civil, traffic, and alcoholic beverage laws; investigation, patrol, custody, and court procedures; emergency responses; and ethics and community relations.

The course provides the participant with the background in the fundamentals of law, procedures, and techniques necessary for success as a law enforcement officer. A rigorous program introduces participants to the handling of firearms, driving techniques, and defensive tactics. A physical fitness program is included as part of the course. Upon completion of all academy requirements, the participant will take the NC Criminal Justice Commission examination.

CCC&TI offers the following program in this area:

For more information about course descriptions or required courses, refer to the current CCC&TI Course Catalog and its corresponding Addendum. Courses in the BLET program are taught during the day.

Employment Outlook

According to the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Outlook Handbook, "The opportunity for public service through law enforcement work is attractive to many because the job is challenging and involves much personal responsibility. Furthermore, law enforcement officers in many agencies may retire with a pension after 25 or 30 years of service, allowing them to pursue a second career while still in their 40s or 50s. Because of relatively attractive salaries and benefits, the number of qualified candidates exceeds the number of job openings in Federal law enforcement agencies and in most State police departments—resulting in increased hiring standards and selectivity by employers."

"Competition should remain keen for higher paying jobs with State and Federal agencies and police departments in more affluent areas. Opportunities will be better in local and special police departments, especially in departments that offer relatively low salaries, or in urban communities where the crime rate is relatively high. Applicants with college training in police science, military police experience, or both should have the best opportunities."

"Employment of police and detectives is expected to grow about as fast as the average for all occupations through 2014. A more security-conscious society and concern about drug-related crimes should contribute to the increasing demand for police services. However, employment growth will be hindered by reductions in Federal hiring grants to local police departments and by expectations of low crime rates by the general public."

Working conditions

The DOL's Occupational Outlook Handbook states, "Police and detective work can be very dangerous and stressful. In addition to the obvious dangers of confrontations with criminals, police officers and detectives need to be constantly alert and ready to deal appropriately with a number of other threatening situations. Many law enforcement officers witness death and suffering resulting from accidents and criminal behavior. A career in law enforcement may take a toll on their private lives."

"Uniformed officers, detectives, agents, and inspectors are usually scheduled to work 40-hour weeks, but paid overtime is common. Shift work is necessary because protection must be provided around the clock. Junior officers frequently work weekends, holidays, and nights. Police officers and detectives are required to work at any time their services are needed and may work long hours during investigations. In most jurisdictions, whether on or off duty, officers are expected to be armed and to exercise their authority whenever necessary."

"The jobs of some Federal agents such as U.S. Secret Service and DEA special agents require extensive travel, often on very short notice. They may relocate a number of times over the course of their careers. Some special agents in agencies such as the U.S. Border Patrol work outdoors in rugged terrain for long periods and in all kinds of weather."

(Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2006-07 Edition, Police and Detectives, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos160.htm (visited April 11, 2006)).

Gainful Employment Program Information

There are no additional costs for this program outside of tuition, fees, books, and supplies.